Download e-book for kindle: Beyond the Rubicon: Romans and Gauls in Republican Italy by J. H. C. Williams

By J. H. C. Williams

ISBN-10: 0198153007

ISBN-13: 9780198153009

ISBN-10: 1423785762

ISBN-13: 9781423785767

During the center and past due Republican classes (fourth to first centuries BC) the Romans lived in worry and loathing of the Gauls of northern Italy, triggered essentially by means of their collective ancient reminiscence of the destruction of the town of Rome by way of Gauls in 387 BC. by means of interpreting the literary proof on the subject of the ancient, ethnographic, and geographic writings of Greeks and Romans of the interval focussing on invasion and clash, this e-book makes an attempt to reply to the questions how and why the Gauls grew to become the lethal enemy of the Romans. Dr. Williams additionally examines the complicated thought of the Gauls as 'Celts' which has been so influential in ancient and archaeological money owed of northern Italy within the overdue pre-Roman Iron Age by means of sleek students. The publication concludes that historic literary proof and sleek ethnic presumptions approximately 'Celts' aren't a legitimate foundation for reconstructing both the heritage of the Romans' interplay with the peoples of northern Italy or for analyzing the fabric proof.

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The prestige they could now gain among Romans with their writings was one element of continuity with the fame they had previously won in the courts and libraries of the Hellenistic kingdoms. But the relationship of Polybius’ writings on the West to the conquest and the conquerors is different from that of his literary predecessors, first because this was not a Greek conquest, and secondly because the new sources of literary patronage in Rome were not yet accustomed to consuming such Greek reflections on their conquests and the nature of their power.

6–12. 31 Among other examples of vanitas Graecorum (‘false tales told by Greeks’), Pliny mentions the theory of one Demostratus, who opined that amber came from Italy and that it was in fact solidified lynx urine; and the refinement of Zenothemis, who located these animals on the banks of the Po. 32 Pliny, for his part, knew as a local that this was all nonsense and explained the long-standing association of amber with northern Italy with reference to the common custom of Transpadane peasant women of wearing amber as an ornament.

Said 1978 on Orientalism in modern European academic and political thought. 55 34 The Discovery of Celtic Italy its, or even their own, masters. Their motivation in the Roman period must therefore rather have been scientific curiosity and academic competition rather than politically or culturally rooted strategies of power and domination over their foreign objects of inquiry. The prestige they could now gain among Romans with their writings was one element of continuity with the fame they had previously won in the courts and libraries of the Hellenistic kingdoms.

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Beyond the Rubicon: Romans and Gauls in Republican Italy (Oxford Classical Monographs) by J. H. C. Williams


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